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Privacy Policy

The Art of Riding is committed to respecting and protecting the personal privacy of customers and those who visit this website. It is our policy to acquire personal information from users only by overt and voluntary means, only when it is in the interest of the user to provide it, and to utilize this information only for the purpose it was provided.

The information that follows explains the types of information our website collects, how it is used, the conditions under which it is made available to third parties and how information is maintained.

What information does this site collect?

This site collects anonymous data that is not indicative of and cannot be traced to an individual without the cooperation of their Internet Service Provider. This data includes information about the user's remote IP address, which website page "linked" to the present requested page, the number of visits each month and geographical region. This information is accepted passively when requesting any file from the server.

Personally identifiable data is collected only by means of form interfaces on the site, into which the user must voluntarily enter the information requested. This information is requested only when it is necessary to accomplish the overt purpose indicated by the interface containing the form that requests it.

No attempt is made to covertly or "quietly" collect personally identifiable information, nor are cookies or any other tracking technology used for the purpose of coordinating information that a user may opt to enter in various interfaces on the site.

How does The Art of Riding use the information it collects?

The anonymous information collected is used to monitor the usage of this website and the interests of those who use it. Data such as the volume of traffic to the server, the number of visitors a certain section of the site receives each month, or popular search terms used to access the site are analyzed to derive general statistics about the site's reach and the audience's usage patterns.

With whom does The Art of Riding share the information that is collected?

The Art of Riding does not share personally identifiable information collected from our website visitors with anyone.

Exception: The Art of Riding reserves the right to use all information at its disposal and to share this information with ISPs and other third parties as necessary to investigate any incident of misuse or abuse of this website, server, or information systems.

How does The Art of Riding maintain the information it collects?

The Art of Riding Email List is an opt-in only mailing list. The list is used only for The Art of Riding business communication.

When you submit information through our Contact form, your submission is sent to us via email. You should not submit any information through this interface that you would not normally provide in an email.

Policy Modifications and Deviations

We may modify this privacy policy and will post those changes here. If the privacy policy changes in the future, we will not use any personal information you have submitted to us under the current Privacy Policy in a manner that is materially inconsistent with this Privacy Policy, without your prior consent.

It may be necessary to deviate from this general policy in unique instances and for specific purposes. In such instances, a link will be provided to a description of the deviation. This link will be placed where it can be reasonably expected to be noticed prior to submitting any information for which this privacy policy is modified or exempted in any way.

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Mark Rashid

RashidBookCover

"I see an 'opening' as anything that allows us to help guide, however briefly, an individual in the direction we ultimately would like to go. An 'opening' can be, and often is, a very subtle form of communication between horse and rider that can easily slip past us if we're not paying attention. 'Openings' can and do work both ways. [...] It amazes me just how small an 'opening' can actually be, whether working with horses or with people, and how easy it can be to create an 'opening' when one is needed."

Mark Rashid

"I truly believe developing the ability to see and use 'openings' effectively is only one piece of what one might refer to as the 'harmony in horsemanship' puzzle. When this idea of understanding 'openings' is brought together with the understanding of two other simlar ideas - making a connection with another indvidual, and the role distance plays in overall communication - I believe it is then that harmony in horsemanship becomes a much less daunting concept for us."

Mark Rashid

Leslie Desmond

LDaudiobook

"Bill knew about a place I did not know existed, or could exist, between a horse and a human being [...] Bill included each one of my horses in that information exchange. Over the course of many months,... he took each one by its lead rope and, later, by the bridle reins. Using what he called his 'better feel', Bill showed me and each of them exactly what he meant by what he did [...] It was not long after I made the switch from force when needed (often) to always customizing the feel I offered to a horse, that two tough horses I had misunderstood for years developed into my most reliable mounts."

Leslie Desmond

The lightest hands carry intent that is recognized instantly by the horse, as seen in the maneuvers he chooses to make with his feet. Whether that horse is ridden or handled, the lightest hands can purposefully influence the speed, direction and sequence of each foot with accuracy, in a manner that is reflected in the horse's body and on his face.

Leslie Desmond

Bill Dorrance

bilsbook

"The Real Masters Understood Feel [...] For example, De Kerbrech, (French officer in the cavalry of Napoleon III) really understood horses. He had it fixed up so the horse could succeed. [...] The first time I read Beudant's book was in the 1950s. The way he explained things, there was no doubt in my mind about what a person needed to do to get these little things working for them and their horse."

Bill Dorrance

“Feel, timing and balance: sometimes it’s best to talk about feel, timing and balance separately, and to learn how to apply each thing separately on the start. But when you apply these three things a little later in your training, then you see that each one of these things supports the other. They are interconnected and all three are real important. You really can’t get along without all three.”

Bill Dorrance

Faverot de Kerbrech

FaverotBookCover

“...plus le deplacement du poids est facile dans tous les sens, plus l'equilibre est parfait. En vertue de ce principe, on dit que le cheval est 'en equilibre' quand de simples indications suffisent au cavalier pour modifier a son gre la disposition du poids sur ses colonnes de soutien”

Faverot de Kerbrech

[Translation: ...the easier it is to shift the weight in any direction, the more perfect the balance. By virtue of this principle, the horse is 'in balance' when a simple indication from the rider is sufficient to modify the distribution of weight across the columns of support (four quarters) accordingly]

Duke of Newcastle

CavendishBookCover

"You must in all Airs follow the strength, spirit, and disposition of the horse, and do nothing against nature; for art is but to set nature in order, and nothing else."

William Cavendish, Duke of Newcastle

"A confrontational approach ‘Astonishes the Weak Horse […] makes a Furious horse Madd; makes a Resty Horse more Resty […] and Displeases all sorts of Horses’. The alternative however is not ‘to Sit Weak […] but to Sit Easie’, in the understanding that ‘The Horse must know you are his Master’"

William Cavendish, Duke of Newcastle